Orange Corn Snake

Orange Corn Snake

Corn snakes are slender with a length of 24 to 72 inches (61 to 182 cm). They are usually orange or brownish-yellow, with large, black-edged red blotches down the middle of the back. On the belly are alternating rows of black and white marks, resembling a checkerboard pattern.

Considerable variation occurs in the coloration and patterns of individual snakes, depending on the age of the snake and the region of the country in which it is found.

They climb trees and enter abandoned buildings in search of prey. However, they are very secretive and spend most of their time underground prowling through rodent burrows. They also often hide under loose bark and beneath logs, rocks, and other debris during the day.

Corn snakes are found in the eastern United States from southern New Jersey south through Florida, west into Louisiana and parts of Kentucky. However, corn snakes are most abundant in Florida and the southeastern U.S.

Corn Snakes are often mistaken for the venomous Copperhead and killed by people. The Corn Snake is harmless and an excellent species to have around for control of rats and mice.